Nike sues MSCHF for trade mark infringement

MSCHF’s latest collaboration with Lil Nas X, who’s new music video to his latest single ‘Montero (Call Me By Your Name)’ got criticised for being inappropriate and ‘evil’. The allegations state that Nike turned their famous Nike Air Max 97’ into ‘Satan Shoes’. Nike filed a lawsuit against MSCHF for trade mark infringement.

On 26th of March, 666 pairs of the ‘Satan Shoes’ were announced for sale by MSCHF, designers from Brooklyn, US. The shoes are alleged to have ‘a drop of human blood’ in them, a pentagram on the laces and a reference to the Bible verse on them saying ‘I saw Satan fall like lightning from heaven’. Nike suffered a massive criticism and boycott, even though the company did not approve or authorize this launch. The company is not associated with MSCHF and did not approve any custom designs. It is obvious that the reaction for this launch have met with confusion of customers, as Nike’s logo was all over the shoes. It is not a surprise that people thought Nike was associated with the launch of ‘Stan Shoes’.

Nike has suffered disrepute and is at risk of losing its customers. The company wants every pair of the ‘Satan shoes’ to be withdrawn from the market, however it may not be possible because people have bought them in a good faith. The court will have to decide on whether the shoes will be sent to its buyers or if the customers will get their money back. The company claims trade mark infringement and states it did not approve the product. Nike claims that MSCHF has violated the federal trade mark law.

Lil Nas X has not commented on the lawsuit yet but is being active on his social media. MSCHF has been called out for its custom designs on Nike shoes before, however this time they will have to take the liability for the harm Nike suffered.

By Alicja Kuźba, student from University of Portsmouth

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